Browsing Tag

migration

  • A cedar waxwing eats ripe berries out of a serviceberry tree on a spring evening in Central Illinois. Cedar Waxwings travel in small flocks searching for food.

    Feed Fruit-Eating Birds

    Birds will eat your leftovers. Even if the fruit is too old for you to eat, birds will enjoy the treat. The sugars give them much-needed energy throughout the year and the juices provide a soothing…

  • Read one woman's story about starting to feed the birds.

    My First Bird Feeder

    I bought my first bird feeder this weekend! The second I put it up, I looked around, expectantly. Where are all the birds? I experienced what most beginning birders must feel: a sense of awe mixed…

  • Shop hummingbird feeders at Duncraft.com

    Keep Nectar from Freezing

    What do you do when you are faced with freezing temperatures and hummingbirds at the same time? Here in the Snow Belt, fall migration can begin as early as August and continue through October and sometimes…

  • Learn a few quick facts about birds!

    5 Common Bird Feeding Myths

    There are many untruths associated with birds and bird feeding and they can be extremely persistent, regardless of the actual facts. Being a wild bird feeding business, Duncraft hears them all! One amazing myth that persists…

  • Snowy Owl

    The Snowy Owl

    There are many names for this wonderful owl of the Arctic.  Sometimes they’re called the Arctic Owl, the Great White Owl or Harfang.  One of the largest and heaviest of the North American owls, the adult…

  • Discover Plum Island, Massachusetts for the best birding around.

    National Wildlife Refuge

    Plum Island is an 8 mile long barrier island off the coast of Newburyport, Massachusetts. At the southern end is Parker River National Wildlife Refuge. Located on the Atlantic Flyway, it’s a vital stopover for migrating…

  • Cedar Waxwing eat berries with its feathers fluffed up, trying to stay warm.

    Birds, Migration and Berries

    Mention the word “migration” to almost anybody, and it will conjure up images of mass amounts of birds flying through the air to some far-off destination for several months. That much, assuredly, is true. Nearly 1,800…

  • Learn why you're seeing so many finches this winter.

    Irruptive Winter Finches

    You may think that now our summer birds have migrated south, you won’t be seeing any new birds this winter. Think again! You might be treated to a visit by Red or White-winged Crossbills, Pine Siskins,…

  • Learn more about bird migration.

    The Autumn Migration of Birds

    Each fall, some of our favorite backyard birds leave to go south for the winter because of autumn migration. After spending the summer in North America – during which they’ve bred a new generation – they begin…