Bird Housing

Discourage House Wrens

Shop the 4373 Bluebird House & Wren Shield at

Our Bluebird House with Wren Shield Features an Adjustable Flap to Block the Entrance and Prevents House Wrens from Entering with Easy Entry for Your Bluebirds and Protection for Your Nesting Birds

With a bluebird house in your backyard, you’ve been looking forward to seeing bluebirds all year. Imagine watching every bluebird fledge, without the risk of predation. Bluebirds raise between one to three broods per year and our Bluebird House with Wren Shield blocks House Wrens from entering, so your bluebirds are safe. Plus, the inner predator guard prevents predators from reaching into the nesting area. This birdhouse has been updated to include easy cleanout from the bottom.

“The House Wren is a fierce competitor for nest holes. They will harass and peck at much larger birds, sometimes dragging eggs and young out of a nest site they want,” according to NestWatch, “even occasionally killing adult birds.” Since House Wrens are native birds, it’s illegal to remove or harm them in any way because they’re protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Visit the links, included below, to learn more about aggressive House Wrens and how to identify them.

Shop the 4373 Bluebird House & Wren Shield at Wren Shield flap has been proven to prevent House Wrens from entering the nesting box in the first place to keep your bluebirds safe. How does the Wren Shield work? Prop the shield up and open (see photo right), so bluebirds can find your nesting box. Once they lay the first egg, adjust the Wren Shield, so it hangs down in front of the entrance (see featured photo above). This allows adult bluebirds to enter the nesting box through the openings on the side of the shield, while also blocking the entrance from view of aggressive species like the House Wren. Once your nestlings are ready to fledge, prop the Wren Shield up and open for your fledglings. Depending on your bluebird species, the nestlings may be ready to fledge within 17 to 21 days, or within 18 to 25 days for Western Bluebirds.

“After two disappointing seasons with Bluebird eggs either on the ground outside the box, or with holes pecked in the eggs inside the box,” said barberrr, customer from Charlotte, NC. “Or with the nest material partially pulled out of the hole, I stumbled onto this elegant solution [the Bluebird House & Wren Shield]. House Wrens which compete with Bluebirds for nesting sites (Carolina Wrens are not a problem) will not enter into a Bluebird box if the entry hole cannot be seen, which is the purpose of the temporary flap. End of story, no more problems. This Spring and Summer we had two successful broods from the same mating pair of Bluebirds, four babies the first clutch and three the second.”

Discourage House Wrens and protect your nesting bluebirds. Shop the Bluebird House and Wren Shield at Happy Birding!

Written by Dawn Coutu



“Common Nesting Birds: House Wren (Troglodytes aedon),” NestWatch, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 2011. 19 Dec. 2017: <>.

“Discouraging House Wrens,” Smith, Elizabeth Zimmerman., 16 May 2016. Woodstock, CT. Mar. 9, 2017. <>.

“Eastern Bluebird,” All About Birds, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 2015. 19 Dec. 2017: <>.

“House Wren,” All About Birds, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 2015. 19 Dec. 2017: <>.

“The House Wren: The Unjustly Accused,” Waters, Hannah. Audubon, 20 May 2016. 19 Dec. 2017: <>.

“The Migratory Bird Treaty Act, Explained,” Harbison, Martha. Audubon, 22 May 2015. Mar. 9, 2017. <>.

“Mountain Bluebird,” All About Birds, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 2015. 19 Dec. 2017: <>.

“Western Bluebird,” All About Birds, The Cornell Lab of Ornithology, 2015. 19 Dec. 2017: <>.

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